Microsoft Integrating APAC Governments With Cybersecurity Council – What Does It Mean For You?

A cybersecurity executive council has been formed by a US software vendor, which has brought together 15 policymakers from seven Asia-Pacific markets, including Indonesia, Singapore, and South Korea, with the aim of exchanging threat intelligence and resources in a “timely and open” manner.

The ICT Applications and Cybersecurity Division would like to express its gratitude to all partners and contributors for their dedication and hard work in assisting the GCI in completing its purpose and accomplishing its goal for 2018.

Microsoft has enlisted the help of policymakers in seven Asia-Pacific countries, including Singapore and Indonesia, to simplify the sharing of threat intelligence and resources across their respective public sectors.

Cybersecurity dangers, which are unavoidable in an increasingly linked world, necessitate “collective” steps across the board, according to the US software giant. The report says malware and ransomware attacks were 1.6 and 1.7 times more common in Asia-Pacific than in the rest of the world.

With Microsoft’s 2019 threat report, developing economies such as Indonesia, India, and Sri Lanka are the most vulnerable to cyberattacks. Microsoft announced on Monday the formation of the Asia-Pacific Public Sector Cybersecurity Enforcement Council, which would bring together government and state policymakers to better combat cybercrime did not.

The purpose was to develop communication between these companies and to make best practices sharing easier.
The region’s ability to respond to cyberattacks will be strengthened by facilitating the exchange of threat intelligence and technologies “in a timely and open manner.”

Malaysia, Korea, and Thailand are three of the council’s original members. However, Microsoft did not specify which government agencies or countries the remaining policymakers belonged to. It merely said that “government leaders, policymakers, regulators, and industry stakeholders” were among the members.

ZDNet also inquired about the council’s key areas, how it planned to collaborate with other regional efforts like the ASEAN Ministerial Conference on Cybersecurity, and whether Microsoft would invite other market players to join.

They’d have access to the company’s security certification training, workshops, and hands-on lab sessions as a result of this. According to Microsoft, the goal was to improve the member countries’ digital and cybersecurity skills.

As most digital infrastructure is owned and controlled by private companies, governments must establish coalitions with tech corporations to push cyberdefense policies and protect the region from attackers. He believes governments must collaborate with technology businesses to drive cybersecurity policies and defend the area from attackers for most private-sector-owned and controlled digital infrastructures.

Meanwhile, Microsoft announced that the council members would be part of an “ecology of cybersecurity industry advisors” forum. They’d have access to the company’s security certification training, workshops, and hands-on lab sessions as a result of this.

According to Microsoft, the goal was to improve the member countries’ digital and cybersecurity skills.

A more aggressive manner and a faster pace are required. Amorn Chomchoey, group captain and acting Deputy Secretary-General of Thailand’s National Cybersecurity Agency, said, “The cybersecurity executive council is an important venue for collaboration between our nations.”

The stronger ties we will form as a result of this council will enable us to foresee and avoid threats as early as possible, before the consequences of cybercrime develop into another cyber-pandemic.”

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